How Effective Is the ‘Why’ of Your Business?

A business without a clear “why” makes goals seem aimless — even if they’re being achieved

Business
(Image: iStock.com/magann)

A business without a why is like a leader without a purpose. However, it’s easy to mix up a goal with a “why,” and this is where things often go wrong for businesses. Let me explain.

A goal is just a destination — a place you want to go to. Don’t get me wrong; goals are important, critical even. But they merely serve as temporary destinations in a broader journey.

Let’s say you’re on a cruise with five destinations (goals) along the way. If the “why” of a cruise is to relax and disconnect while exploring new places, this should serve as the foundation upon which everything else is built. Individual destinations are smaller goals in pursuit of this larger undertaking. This “why” reminds the crew and management what they’re doing outside of tactics and execution. It’s the guiding light that helps shape the perfect trip.

Running a business is no different. Employees aren’t satisfied with simply completing tasks and achieving goals anymore. These days, people want to know why they’re doing something. Why do they get up in the morning? Why do they work for your organization? If they can’t answer these questions, they’re not going to be very happy.

To make things worse, the bigger a company gets, the hungrier the team becomes for purpose. When employees are unsure where they’re going next or why they’re going there at all, they begin to question the business itself. However, if everyone is clear on the why, it ends up acting as a calming influence, especially when the waters are rough.

 

Why Finding Your “Why” Is Important

 

In practical terms, having a “why” is vital for everyone in a company, from the CEO to the intern. If we understand why we do what we do, we can decide what to do next and when to do it. And in many cases, we can do so autonomously, knowing that we’re working towards a common cause we all believe in.

I’ve seen the negative effects of losing sight of your “why” in small, medium and large organizations. When executives are unable to stand for something greater and communicate it to their teams, the effects are devastating. Today, it’s whisperings in the corridors; tomorrow, it’s mass exodus.

So ask yourself this: as a leader in an organization, do you truly know why you do what you do? If the answer is yes, are you communicating this to everyone in the organization? If you are, then great. If not, here are my recommendations.

 

Examine and Question Your “Why”

 

When you’re at a young or growing company, the team is relatively small, the business is young, and agility should come easily. If you’ve lost sight of your “why,” take some time off. Get out of the office and talk to friends, family — even your dog if you need to. Dig deep into your soul and get to the root of why you started this company, why you fight every day to win, and what it is that drives you. Write down your thoughts. Place them on walls, sleep on them, talk through them. Ultimately, you’ll emerge with a succinct message that outlines your “why.”

Once you have something you feel makes sense, push yourself on it. Question it, probe it, and be sure that you believe it, because you’re going to live with it for many years to come. If it isn’t something that truly means something to you — if it’s simply some words on a wall — then you’re headed for disaster, or at the very least, some hard and depressing years of unfulfilling work.

 

Communicate, Communicate, Communicate

 

Assuming you get to a “why” that truly works, the next bit is easy: communicate, communicate, communicate. Oh, and communicate some more. Explain to your team, your execs, your investors, to anyone and everyone, what your “why” is. Use spoken words, written words, even pictures if you need to. The goal is to make sure your “why” is understood and believed by your team.

Read more at www.businesscollective.com…

 

 


Simon Berg leads Ceros, the interactive content marketing platform, with an innate curiosity about the world and how everything works.    

BusinessCollective, launched in partnership with Citi, is a virtual mentorship program powered by North America’s most ambitious young thought leaders, entrepreneurs, executives and small business owners.