5 Best Ways to Vet Your New Employer

Sure, you want them to like you, but not before deciding if you like them.

Next Employer
(Image: File)

As a potential job prospect, trust that you are being evaluated to the extent that available information allows.  You should also want to know everything you can find on your possible new employer.

Backgrounds are checked, references are called, Twitter feeds are scanned, Facebook posts are analyzed, Instagram pictures are scrutinized, LinkedIn pages are scoured, connections assessed, and it doesn’t always stop there. Employers thoroughly check you out to see if you’re a great fit for them.

You should be performing the same thorough investigation to see if the employer fits for you. Before accepting an interview or offer, be sure to do your due diligence, as to not waste efforts or time. BlackEnterprise.com tells you how.

1. Google

This is always a safe start. Search the company’s name with employee reviews. This should present a series of resources and blogs from former employees ranting and raving about their individual experiences.

Glassdoor  and Indeed are helpful in offering insight on current and former employees assessments of pros and cons, salaries, and recommendations. These are helpful avenues that often offer candid intel on company culture, management, turnover, growth potential, benefits, disadvantages, and more.

2. Social Media

Just as the company is scrutinizing all of your timelines, you should not hesitate to do the same. Is the company representing itself in ways that you respect? Do you approve of the company’s general messaging and audience? Does the company’s social media channels reflect a tone you’d desire in a work place?

3. Phone a Friend

Oftentimes there is someone in your network that knows somebody, that knows somebody. See if that known somebody happens to have insight on the position and company you’re interested in.

LinkedIn is also a great resource to find former employees and connections that may be helpful in providing you with pertinent employer information.

4. Employer Website

This can be more telling than it initially seems. The website can offer you a sneak peek into the tone, priorities, and nature of the company. Is the content or feel of the website adding up to what you’ve discovered via social media, reviews, and friends? Does the company seem to be adequately representing themselves and the work of their employees via the site? Is it informative? Is the content strictly formal or does it reflect a more lax, informal working environment? Is the content direct and concise, setting a tone for how you hope your potential employer will be? Can you support the company’s overall mission?

5. Ask the Employer

Dive into those pertinent questions. Why did the person whose position you’re potentially taking leave? What would most employees say is the worst aspect of the company? What’s the best? If employees could change one to three things about the company, what would those things be? Are the employees happy overall, or is the general consensus misery?

There are ways to know what you’d like to know prior to placing your foot in the door. Thoroughly vetting your potential employer can be the leg-up you need to ask perceptive, informed, and relevant questions throughout your interview or onboarding process.

Sure, you want them to like you, but not before deciding that you like them.

 



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