Stressed at Work?

How to manage anxiety on the job

Everyone has feelings of anxiety. How can you tell if it’s something more serious?

A shortness of breath, trouble focusing, shaking hands. If it last consistently for longer than two weeks, that’s a sign that you need to talk to someone and have that checked out. If you are having panic attacks, that’s really taking it to the next level. You should talk to your primary care provider.

How do you create a better work environment to avoid these feelings of stress?

The first thing is to take the temperature of your work environment. Notice how you feel when you get to work. Are you happy? Are you anxious? Figure out what it is you like and what you don’t like and what you can control and can’t control. Having positive thoughts and a positive attitude helps. It may mean reaching out to a mentor or finding some humor in your work and laughing about it. If there is someone that you trust, get together and find ways to improve your work environment.

What resources are there to properly deal with workplace anxiety?

People in America report being more stressed than ever. It’s important to asses your mental well-being. Your first step should be a visit to your health care provider.

Most companies have employee assistance programs that are vastly under utilized. They are a tremendous resource that you are paying for. There is a lack of trust, though, because employees worry that what is going on with them medically will get back to their supervisor. Go to your company’s human resources department to find out about this service. You can also seek the help of a psychologist, or go to see your minister. Ultimately, if you notice that you are not feeling up to par, it is your responsibility to take care of it. The key is to be in tune with your body.

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  • Phil

    Good article but it lacked the substantive content I was hoping for. This is the level of quality I would expect from a lay person, not a professionally licensed psychiatrist.