The Race is On

The Internet can be a vital tool for firms vying for new talent

Search for “Deloitte” on YouTube.com and somewhere in the top 10 results there is sure to be at least one recruitment-related video. For example, the Deloitte Film Festival is a recruitment tool that features two- to three-minute, employee-produced videos creatively highlighting their experiences at the professional services firm.

Companies that ignore the Internet as a recruiting tool are sure to miss out on a big chunk of potential job candidates that are vying for positions. But those firms whose strategies are limited to posting want ads on sites such as Monster.com and CareerBuilder.com are also missing the boat, particularly when it comes to filling the ranks with tech-savvy Generation Y employees.

“If you’re fishing for Gen Y employees, you have to go where they are, and they are all online,” says Lisa Orrell, a human resources consultant, professional speaker, and president of The Orrell Group in San Jose, California.

Deloitte employees had their videos published online, gaining recognition both for the individuals and for the company as a whole. Potential recruits can view the footage and decide whether or not they want to pursue jobs at the company. “It’s a brilliant recruiting tool in that some of the videos really get to the heart and essence of what it’s such as to work at Deloitte, and help dispel the myth that it’s an ‘old fogy’ accounting firm,” Orrell says. “It’s been a phenomenal way for the company to recruit and attract new talent.”

According to Don Breckenridge Jr., president and CEO at St. Louis-based Sendouts L.L.C., a provider of software and training to staffing and recruitment firms, roughly 95% of all recruiting is done online these days. “Recruiters who aren’t online—and using the right tools—are at a major competitive disadvantage,” Breckenridge says.
Companies that are actively fishing in the talent pool should start with a robust, information-packed Website that can be linked to individual recruiting efforts (such as those placed on YouTube, MySpace, or LinkedIn, for example) for easy access by potential candidates. Advertise the open positions on the company site, Breckenridge says, but don’t rely solely on that venue to be “sticky” enough to attract the recruits.

Instead, use a combination of advertisements on major job boards (such as Monster and CareerBuilder) and more general—but heavily used and populated—social networking sites such as LinkedIn and ZoomInfo to proactively seek out and recruit job candidates. The contact may not always be direct, according to Breckenridge, who explains that the “social networking” aspect of such sites can lead a midsized firm to recruits who may not necessarily be apt to search company Websites for positions.

“When you start building a network of contacts you can see how many degrees of separation you are from any one person,” Breckenridge says. “So while you may not be in direct contact with John Doe, you may meet someone who knows him and connects you with him.” To be even more proactive, Breckenridge advises firms to use an information aggregation site such as ZoomInfo, where recruiters can look up information about

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