America’s Leading Doctors

From treating heart disease to fighting cancer, these physicians are changing the world of medicine

Surgery & Associate Dean of Minority Affairs, Drexel University School of Medicine
Specialty: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cosmetic Surgery
Pollard is one of only about 35 African American women who are board-certified plastic surgeons. She is highly sought after to share her opinions on issues and complications of cosmetic surgery that primarily affect women of color. She has appeared on NBC’s Today Show and The Oprah Winfrey Show.

SURGERY
Spencer Amory, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Title: Jose M. Ferrer Clinical Professor of Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons; Chief, Division of General Surgery, New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center
Specialty: General Surgery, Laparoscopic Surgery, and Surgical Endoscopy
The current awardee of the Columbia Leonard Tow award for humanism in medicine, Amory specializes in disparate areas of surgery including laparoscopic, colonoscopy, and gall bladder. His techniques yielded one of the lowest open cholecystectomy (gall bladder) rates nationwide.

Edward M. Barksdale Jr., M.D.
Title: Chief of Pediatric Surgery, Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, Case Medical Center, Case University Medical School; Vice Chairman of Surgery, University Hospital/Case Medical Center
Specialty: Pediatric Surgery
Barksdale was once a clinical instructor in surgery on the faculty of Harvard Medical School. He went on to complete a fellowship in pediatric surgery at Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati. Barksdale’s research in neuroblastoma was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, M.D.
Title: Chief, Scoliosis Service, Hospital for Special Surgery
Specialty: Orthopaedic Surgery
Boachie-Adjei specializes in performing surgeries to correct spine deformities in patients from infants to adults. He also helped establish the Foundation of Orthopaedics and Complex Spine, which treats bone and joint disorders throughout West Africa.

Charles Bridges, M.D., Sc.D.
Title: Associate Professor of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine; Faculty of Bioengineering Department, University of Pennsylvania; Chief, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Pennsylvania Hospital
Specialty: Cardiac Surgery
Because of his revolutionary work in molecular cardiac surgery, a unique approach to gene therapy for heart failure, Bridges has received $3 million from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. The four-year grant will enable him to expand on a methodology that could provide alternatives to heart transplants and artificial heart devices.

Clive Callender, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Title: LaSalle D. Leffall Jr. Professor of Surgery and Chairman, Department of Surgery, Howard University College of Medicine; Director, Transplant Center, Howard University Hospital
Specialties: Transplantation Surgery, General Surgery
Callender is a leading physician in organ transplant medicine. He has the distinction of becoming the first doctor to be asked to become a LaSalle D. Leffall Jr. professor of surgery at Howard University College of Medicine.

Specialty: Shoulder and Knee Orthopaedic Surgery
Cato T. Laurencin, M.D., Ph.D.
Pratt Distinguished Professor and Chairman of Orthopaedic Surgery, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, and Professor of Chemical Engineering, University of Virginia
These days, things are pretty busy for Laurencin. An internationally known shoulder and knee clinical specialist with cutting edge research as a professor of chemical engineering and biomedical engineering, he is fellowship trained in shoulder surgery and sports medicine and one of only three practicing orthopaedic surgeons in America elected to the prestigious Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Recently named to the 2007 Scientific

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    Having suffered from non-hodgkins, this was good to see. Thanks for this.