Mo & Kita Help Women ‘Define Your Pretty’

More than reality stars, Monique Jackson and Kita Williams are entrepreneurs focused on female empowerment

Williams and Jackson with their client, NFL star Terrell "T.O." Owens

What are some of your most important business tips for women trying to make it as entrepreneurs?

Williams: We have three business tips that we give women for building a successful brand. The first thing is having more than one financial stream of revenue [because] when one of your financial streams of revenue is pulled away—whether you get laid off from your job, you get fired or even if the money isn’t coming in the way it used to—if you have something else that’s bringing in some money you won’t feel so desperate if something catastrophic happens. That’s the first part of what we call the three Ps—passion, progress and profit. If you have a hobby make it a passion and you will progress. The second and third are, know your niche and play the part you want to become.

Speaking of becoming the part you play, you both are very vocal about the negative portrayal of Black women on reality TV. What are your thoughts on reality TV and women of color?

Williams: Why is it that we have to pull hair and fight to get on the mainstream shows? But, at the end of the day we feed into the image because if we have to act a little bit more belligerent or “ghetto” then we’re going to act belligerent or ghetto and if we stop doing what they expect us to do then they’ll see women of color—people of color period—in a different way. We won’t look like animals acting up. We won’t have to be really obnoxious when the cameras are on. I think it’s unfair and if you think about the Basketball Wives they go to lunch, go to coffee shops, go to somebody’s house and talk about what they did and who didn’t show up and why she’s not talking to you. On our show we have real story content and it’s a story that unfolds over 10 weeks. Whatever is going on in our lives is not going to be resolved in one episode, it’s happening throughout. You see us doing all sorts of things but unfortunately there’s no substance there when you’re talking about who didn’t come to my bridal shower, who didn’t show up here or why you slept with my ex husband or why [are] you talking about me. That’s high school stuff! Monique and I really want to be known to change the concept and maturity of the way people see us.

Jackson: Unfortunately, the way society portrays us [as women of color] and the way we are being puppets in allowing ourselves to be portrayed, you know the catfights and the derogatory statements will be the ones left in because it gives the audience a wow factor. So if you are fighting to play because you can get a paycheck you will go the extra mile or two.

Is it safe to assume that you’ll be executive producing more shows with a positive spin?

Jackson: Definitely. We’re in the pitching business. We stumbled upon it by accident but we definitely have been bitten by the producer’s bug, the creative side bug, so we are looking to produce other shows.

Williams: We are the brown Kardashians with substance and I don’t mean that in any way with knocking [the Kardashians], but we use them as a prototype. We have real substance with how we got to where we are because the crazy part is Terrell can be Kim Kardashian all day long because it was Terrell that allowed us to showcase who we are because I believe everyone in life has a purpose. Terrell needed us just as much as we needed him. He wouldn’t have been able to pitch a show by himself. He would have never had the time nor the resources but we also realized that the Kardashians are a multimillion-dollar brand because they took their brand and made it a business. We would love to expand the brand of Mo and Kita, so you guys can see us outside of Terrell, kind of like Kourtney and Khloe.

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