Daring To Fail Greatly

Amazing victories are often preceded by devastating setbacks. You can triumph over the agony of defeat.

reinforce your sense of self-worth, and positive self-esteem helps pave the way for positive outcomes.

Once that’s done, it’s important to assess what your particular setback is doing to you, as well as what you are to learn from it. This process should involve getting outside input, but beware of where you look.

“The worst person to have a conversation with is exactly who we tend to go to,” says Guillory. “It’s the person who will drag you down or give you pity or who feels as disenfranchised as you do. You need to get with that person who’s going to say, ‘You need to get up, get it together, and get on with it.’ It may piss you off initially, but that’s the same person you’ll be thanking three weeks later.”

Finally, take action and remember: The power of the action you take is in direct proportion to how powerful you feel as an individual. Seek out people, seminars, workshops, books, articles, opportunities, and tapes that challenge the limitations you place on yourself. The whole idea is to expand one’s thinking, not stay in the same mental cocoon.

“A crisis is an opportunity to discover a dimension of yourself that you wouldn’t discover when things are going well–a toughness, a skill, a fortitude that lies latent when everything is fine. Those characteristics then become critical to your view of yourself,” says Guillory.

Which brings us back to that old axiom, Whatever doesn’t kill us makes us stronger. “If you take these steps, you can come out of the most devastating crisis with a stronger, better, more positive, more complete sense of who you are and what you are truly capable of,” says Guillory. And that has far more value than any mere trophy–Oscar included.

Pages: 1 2
ACROSS THE WEB