Log On For Work

Q: I have never used the Internet in my job searches. There is so much available. Do you have any suggestions on where to start?
–Via e-mail

A: The Internet is a wonderful tool, suggests Frances E. Roehm who, along with Margaret Riley Dikel, compiled the Guide to Internet Job Searching, 2002 — 03 Edition (Contemporary Books, $14.95). It offers a broader selection of listings than local newspapers. It’s important, however, to wade through all the hype. “Some people, although they are not computer illiterate, are overwhelmed by the Internet,” says Roehm. “They feel they have to get a résumé on Monster.com. That’s because that site has been heavily promoted. That is a very passive approach to job hunting.” Roehm offers several tips:

  • Become more focused. Check out Websites that list jobs in your field, or visit a particular company’s Website. This gives prospective employers looking for specific qualifications an opportunity to review your résumé. Roehm’s guidebook offers a listing of job Websites and industry associations in diverse areas such as aeronautics, labor, technology, mining, and politics. The book also provides listings by individual states and sources for international opportunities.
  • Become a member. Many industry organizations list employment information on their Websites but reserve it for members only.
  • Be careful where you register. Most job-listing Websites are free. There are some, however, that require you to register. “I wouldn’t register with a general Website,” says Roehm. “I might consider registering with one that was targeted to my professional area, and even then I would check their privacy policy before I did. Many of these organizations will sell your information.”
ACROSS THE WEB