Ready to call it quits?

Read this before you give up

So, things aren’t going as planned. Maybe it’s your professional life. Perhaps it’s the personal side of life that’s got you feeling stressed. Whatever the area, the challenge has waned and the learning curve has flattened. Every day seems like drudgery and you’ve taken all that you can stand. You’ve decided it’s time to throw in the towel.

"Quitting is a big, but not necessarily better decision," says Cynthia Stringer, an executive career coach and president of Success By Design, a Chicago-based professional enhancement company. "It tends to be reactive, with very limited analysis and communication."

While quitting may be an impulsive response to a situation that arises out of frustration, boredom and/or stress, you should "never quit impulsively. Think with your values not with your feelings." She provides two points to ponder before you consider dropping the ball and walking away.

  • Don’t make excuses. Quitting is just that-quitting. Avoid the temptation of calling it by some less-harsh term, such as a change of strategy, says Stringer. In fact, you should recognize that quitting, more often than not, is the result of not having one.
  • Weigh the costs of quitting. "Doing it too soon often results from not properly weighing short-term gains and long-term costs," suggests Stringer. Assess the pros and cons of giving up. Closely analyze how it will affect your short- and long-term plans.

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