Squeeze Play

Is America's offshoring movement hurting black businesses? Many are applying innovative strategies to buck the trend.

to Chennai, India’s fourth largest city, where he now supervises a bustling office of 200 financial analysts and more than 1,000 legal researchers and document processing professionals. Sapp has built an operation that mirrors office outsourcing schemes in the U.S., except for one crucial difference: His office works around the clock.

To hear Sapp tell it, the writing was on the wall. “Taking into consideration the post dot-com technology boom and the resulting corporate outsourcing fallout, it simply made sense to take my career offshore, and OfficeTiger afforded me the opportunity to do so,” says Sapp. Sapp says his story shows that African Americans should not retreat from global trends. “The world is evolving toward a more level playing field for all people,” says Sapp. “Those who do not think, act, and accept these changes will be left behind. I think African Americans should start thinking outside of their comfort zones and step up to challenge the status quo.”

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