STOCKPILE

Moore
Many on Wall Street see Canda’s Moore Corp. (NYSE: MCL) as a defensive stock because of its hefty 5% dividend. Sabu Joseph, assistant vice president and research analyst with Studivant & Co. (609-627-4500), however, believes the business forms and information management company has found new ways to grow. Under new management, Moore aims to boost market share with new products, including a widely praised Internet- based software program to help companies track workflow. The stock, as of the close of 1996, was trading at roughly $20, and had a P/E ratio 20% below its competitors. Joseph sees earnings rising from $1.14 a share in 1995 to the $1.45-$1.50 per share range in 1996, and is projecting a rise to the $1.50-$1.70 range this year. He holds a 12-18- month target price “north of $25 a share.”

Amphenol
The Kenwood Group’s Barbara Bowles (312-368-1666) calls Amphenol Corp. (NYSE:APH), a Wallingford, Connecticut, maker of fiber optic connectors and coaxial cable equipment,” a growth story with a value kicker.” Now that telephone and cable companies are hurrying to upgrade their systems and offer new services, Aphenol’s sales should boom, says Bowles. Wall Street agrees, projecting earnings to grow 20% over the next five years. Meanwhile, Amphenol’s stock price of $22 a share is a bargain, given the company’s P/E ratio of 12, compared to an industry average of 17. Bowlers says earnings of about $1.46 in 1996 should rise to $1.80 this year, and she targets he company’s share price to rise to $27 in the next 12 months.

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