Super Bowl Decoded: The Financial Impact of the Big Game

It's not just the commercials that bring in big money on Super Bowl Sunday

(Image: Getty)

GAINING YARDAGE & PROFITS

In addition to the stadium, the NFL, the networks and retailers, several businesses, large and small, see major profit come Super Bowl Sunday. The book value of the 100% sterling silver Vince Lombardi trophy—which was named after the first coach to win the Super Bowl following his passing in 1970—is said to be worth well over $20,000. It’s produced by Tiffany & Co. each year and takes approximately four months to make.

Though Super Bowl performers are usually some of the most popular musicians and can receive over $100,000 for performing anywhere else, acts for the halftime show are actually not paid monetarily. With an estimated 111 million people watching, they couldn’t buy that kind of exposure. Further, artists are often called on to headline elite Super Bowl parties that take place during the course of the weekend. The parties, hosted by companies like ESPN, DIRECTV, and Maxim magazine, are the place to be for celebrities and VIP’s in town for the weekend’s events. This year, tickets to the hottest Super Bowl parties range from about $800 to $2,000 for “regular” admission.

In addition to the game, a big part of Super Bowl Sunday is the food. With loads of snacks and beverages on the menu, the big game often ranks as the second highest food consumption event after Thanksgiving, so supermarkets certainly cash in on this American “holiday.” Party retailers such as Party City and online sellers like Party411.com see one of their highest profit periods during this time of year as well. With party planners seeking to give their guests a unique experience, novelty stores carrying Super Bowl related decorations and specialty items, often see a large increase in sales and visibility as well

Actual tickets to the game range from a little over $2,000 for the nosebleed section to as much as $645,000 for a 35-seat suite along with full service, and amenities. On the more “affordable” end of the spectrum, diehard fans can watch the game on the big screen outside the stadium for $200.

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