In Case You Missed It: Celebrating Black History

A roundup of some of the stories we published here at Black Enterprise celebrating our culture and history

black history

This year throughout Black History Month, Black Enterprise published a number of articles celebrating our culture and the American heroes who often go unacknowledged in school textbooks.

Here’s a roundup of some of the Back History stories we published:

 

The Slave Behind the Jack Daniel’s Recipe

 

A black man played a key role in crafting America’s best-selling whiskey

 

Jack (Image: iStock.com/NoDerog)

 

Jasper “Jack” Daniel is credited with inventing the popular whiskey although he learned the trade of whiskey making from a slave known as Uncle Nearis. Click here to learn more.

 


Black History Month: Dorothy Counts and School Integration

But the fight to integrate the nation’s schools is current events

 

(Image: Dorothy Counts)

 

 

 

 

In 1957, Dorothy Counts made history integrating a Charlotte, North Carolina, high school. Read how she’s still working to desegregate schools today.

 


 

Inventions Made by Black Slaves Denied Patents

African Americans forced or born into slavery were almost always shut out of the patent process. Yet, they did invent

 

(Image: eachoneteachone.org.uk)

One group of prolific innovators were black inventors born or forced into American slavery, says Shontavia Johnson, a professor of Intellectual Property Law

 


 

Black History Then and Now: ‘The Harvard Law Review’

ImeIme Umana follows in the footsteps of Barack Obama, as the new president of ‘The Harvard Law Review’

 

ImeIme Umana (Image: Twitter.com/imeimeumana)

 

The Harvard Law Review, the prestigious journal once led by Barack Obama, has elected its first black, female president, ImeIme Umana.

 


 

 

Google Doodle Honors Black Female Sculptor for Black History Month

Google celebrates the 19th-century sculptor 

sculptor (Image: Wikimedia/Creative Commons)

Google Doodle kicked off Black History Month celebrating Edmonia Lewis, the first internationally recognized African American and Native American sculptor. Click here to read more.