In the News: Tensions in Libya Causing Economic Ripple Effect; Kevin Frazier on CBS; Study Links Racial Identity and Happiness

A few noteworthy headlines around the Web

Headline news (Courtesy of Thinkstock)

As tensions rise in Libya and forces loyal to Col. Moammar Gadhafi launch attacks near the oil port of Ras Lanouf, according to the Associated Press, big businesses and oil companies have stopped buying oil from the North African country.

Recent reports show companies such as Morgan Stanley and BP PLC have stopped buying and trading crude in Libya. It’s a move that’s having a ripple effect across the Unites States with businesses factoring the cost of oil into their overall market price. Currently, oil is trading at its highest point in two and a half years.

  • Kevin Frazier Makes History with New Job at CBS

Kevin Frazier was named the new co-anchor of The Insider today, making the former Sports Center host the first African-American male to host a daily entertainment news show on a major television network. He’ll be joining The Insider anchor Lara Spencer.

Linda Bell Blue, executive producer of CBS Television Distribution’s Entertainment Tonight and The Insider, had kind words to share about Frazier, during the announcement. “Kevin has been an integral part of the ET/Insider family for seven years,” said Blue. “He is one of the most respected correspondents in entertainment news with incredible sources and connections that will be put to good use as co-anchor as The Insider.”

  • Study Reveals Being ‘Black and Proud’ Can Lead to Greater Happiness

A recent study shows Black people who identify more strongly with their racial identity are generally happier, according to psychology researchers at Michigan State University.

Previous research has linked racial identity and positive outcomes such as self-esteem, according to Stevie C.Y. Yap, but this has never been done.“This is the first empirical study we know of that shows a relationship between racial identity and happiness,” said Yap, lead researcher and doctoral candidate in psychology at MSU.
Yap suggests the connection may be sparked by a sense of belongingness, which is particularly important to women.

ACROSS THE WEB