Diversifying Google: Meet Three Black Google Engineers

While the diversity and inclusion effort in tech continues, meet three black engineers in prestigious careers at Google

As tech companies continue to share diversity statistics with the public, it’s clear there is still a lot of work to do to boost inclusion in tech. Yet, people of color are working at some of the largest companies in technology even though their numbers are few.

Google’s latest diversity stats from January 2015  show that 2% of its workforce is black. Meet three successful Google engineers:

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Clennita Justice

Clennita Justice, Senior Engineering Program Manager, Google; Image: Google

Clennita Justice
Clennita Justice is a Senior Engineering program manager. She’s been at Google more than half a decade.

She was hired to launch Google e-books, which became Google Play Books. Now, she does user research and Product Excellence—a focus on making the right product for the right user—part of Google’s shift in culture from launching to adopting. Justice’s particular area of focus is infrastructure.

Originally from Los Angeles, Justice has a Master’s degree in Computer Science from Howard University. She pursued a degree in Computer Science before the Internet was ubiquitous and before the big push to get women and girls interested in STEM, and despite the insistence of her uncle (who worked for IBM) that she study business.

She actually studied business for a year at Denver University as a business major. When she took a course in DOS programming and received an “A”, she was hooked. With renewed focus (plus hating the winters in Denver), she transferred to the University of California, Berkeley and switched her major to Computer Science. She eventually taught herself HTML and JavaScript as the Internet took off.

A pivotal moment in her life was when someone in the Computer Science department at her university said he didn’t think she would stay in Computer Science. Not only did she stay and complete her degree, but she received the best job offer of anyone in her class.

Justice is a strong believer in self-educating. She also advises, “Anyone who gets into tech has to be a constant learner. That’s how you stay relevant.”

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