Invaluable Experiences: First-Job Lessons That Could Lead to Future Success

Stay on top of your game by taking a look back

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You may be a seasoned professional, re-entering the job market, or trying out a new career. Whatever your path and no matter the industry you are working in, reflecting on your beginnings will keep you humble and hungry for success. CareerBuilder blogger Susan Ricker details via AOL Jobs that there are five key lessons you learned at your first job that are essential to your continuous success.

She cites making a cordial relationship with your coworkers a priority just as important as doing your job as one lesson you learn as a newbie that could help long after those premier career years are over. 

You may find yourself being part of a team or even the leader of a team later on in life. Having an amicable relationship with your coworkers is essential to motivation and will translate into the amount of effort they will give you and the company. A good relationship will foster better communication which helps get things done.

She also adds that using your paycheck for “both fun and for saving” as a great habit to carry into your later years. During your first job you may have blown one or more checks on some non-essentials that had you wondering where did all the money go. A job that has retirement planning and healthcare benefits will help you manage your money better and hopefully you will have learned a lesson about budgeting from your earlier experiences.

The newbie understanding that “your job isn’t a sure thing,” is also an awesome way to look at things even as a mid-level to senior professional, she adds. When starting a new position you are at times filled with uncertainty about many things. As you get more comfortable you start making concessions that could lead to the unemployment line. Keep in mind that you are not irreplaceable.

For more, visit AOLJobs.

ACROSS THE WEB
  • Our Diversity at Work

    Thank you for these valuable lessons for success at work. I would add that one of our problems as ethnic Minorities is that we usually have access
    to smaller networks that we can count on; thus, less knowledge of available
    jobs opportunities. Network importance stems from the simple fact that
    people want to give jobs to people they know. By definition, network is the key
    informers (family members, friends, professors, colleagues, employers, etc.)
    who supply us with important information about labor market opportunities.

    This is why we should make it one of our priority to find ways to increase our network to insure future success.

    Our Diversity at Work.