Boss Moves: 6 Effective Ways to Handle Raise Requests

This strategy will ensure you don't have a disgruntled worker on your hands

(Image: Thinkstock)

Asking for more money can be a very awkward situation for the employee—and the boss.

Jessica Stillman, an Inc. writer, talked with Matt Wallaert, founder of GetRaised, a Website dedicated to helping women come up with the numbers to back their raise requests. Wallaert found that not only is the site a resource to employees, but to managers as well.

As a boss, here are a few ways to avoid an awkward situation and handle a raise request with care:

Validate. Make it clear that you understand the request and set the ground rules. Make sure they know this is a business discussion and all of the emotions should be kept in check.

Assign some homework. What do you need to know to make this decision? For example: What are the comparable industry salary numbers? Have their responsibilities increased?

They deserve it. If all the numbers lined up, they are in the money, but are you? Will you be able to support their increase in salary?

They don’t. It could be that they actually do not deserve a raise. Help them set up a strategy to making a raise a possibility for the future.

No Money. An acknowledgement of their success will be nice, but it is not proper compensation. Depending on the size of your company you could request more money from your supervisors. If you are in a smaller company where that is not possible you could try non-monetary compensation such as a day off.

Be Proactive? Get in front of the eight ball and let your employees know that their service is valued. Let them know the door is open and you are willing.

Read more at Inc.

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  • mizzmax19

    I can tell you first hand we are in a culture where corporate America wants more for less. Very few companies are offering raises and even if you deserve it, chances are you won’t get one….that money is reservered for the “upper division”. Since working for my organization, I have earned my Bachelor’s degree, completed two Manager cerftifications, volunteer to be a peer to my fellow employees AND lead monthly classes IN ADDITION to my current job responsibility and I have to say that my morale is low because in this sector, if you are not in Sales or some type of VP, you won’t see any money. After this company, I am DONE with corporate America!