‘Un-Tamed: Hair Body Attitude’ Celebrates Black Womanhood

New Black Fest creator commissions black female playwrights to write woman-centered works

(Image: cincinnatimagazine.com)
(Image: cincinnatimagazine.com)

Playwright/Screenwriter Keith Josef Adkins is committed to providing a space for African American artists to explore and express the nuances of the black experience. In addition to writing about black life in his own theatrical and film projects, Adkins created The New Black Fest, an annual festival which brings together black playwrights from around the world to present works with an African American focus, such as Hands Up, a series of plays written by black men in response to the deaths of Trayvon Martin and Mike Brown, as well as institutionalized racism.

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This Fall, at the Martin Segal Theater at CUNY Graduate Center, five dynamic playwrights will present a series of dramatic works called Un-Tamed: Hair Body Attitude: Short Plays By Black Women, which will center on the black female experience and it’s relationship to black culture and social justice issues facing the African American community. Featured writers include Nikkole Salter, an Obie-award winning actress and Pulitzer- Prize nominee, and Playwrights Chisa Hutchinson, Corie Thomas, Lenelle Moise, and Jocelyn Bioh.

BlackEnterprise.com caught up with Keith Josef Adkins to discuss Un-Tamed: Hair Body Attitude, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the importance of including black women in conversations about racial profiling.

BlackEnterprise.com: Tell me more about Un-Tamed: Hair Body Attitude.

Adkins: In the tradition of Facing Our Truth and Hands Up, I commissioned five black women playwrights to write short plays on things that resonate around hair, body, and attitude in relation to the trending conversations about women parody. With Hands Up, where I commissioned six black male playwrights, the conversation was ‘who [are] the leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement?’ Which was two or three black women.

There have been conversations about the representation of the presence of female voices in [discussions] about social justice, policing, and profiling. During the time I commissioned these playwrights, I was under the impression that the profiling issue was a black male issue, that it was predominant among black men. I still believe that to be true, statistically. But there has to be a more integrated conversation around profiling. It can’t just be about black men. There are women — Sandra Bland, the young woman at the Texas swimming pool party that was slammed [down]— so, obviously, this is a major issue and a concern.

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One Response to ‘Un-Tamed: Hair Body Attitude’ Celebrates Black Womanhood

  1. Pingback: Misty Copeland To Debut on Broadway | BlackPride.in

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