Edges Secured! Louisiana Requires All Cosmetologists to Undergo Training for Textured Hair
Fashion & Beauty News

Edges Secured! Louisiana Requires All Cosmetologists to Undergo Training for Textured Hair

(IStock/wsfurlan)

Louisiana is set to make history as the first state in the country to require all of its cosmetologists to undergo training on how to properly do textured hair.

On November 1, The State Board of Cosmetology voted unanimously to require cosmetology students to learn how to cut and style textured hair in order to pass the Louisiana State Board of Cosmetology licensing exam, WGNO reports. Chairman of the Louisiana State Board of Cosmetology Edwin Neill credited the resolution for being a game-changer for the beauty industry.

“65 percent of the population has textured hair defined as wavy, curly or coily hair. We don’t want people to be turned away at a salon because the salon can’t do their type of hair. That’s not what anybody wants so this is a step in the right direction,” Neill said

Textured hair is identified as kinky, curly, or wavy in its natural state and is typically found on people of color. The new ruling came after Neill questioned why the state didn’t require textured hair training as part of it’s curriculum, Good Morning America reports.

“There are many salon horror stories about what happens when cosmetologists are not properly educated on working with textured hair,” Neill said in a statement.

“Today there are still sometimes disparities in the salon experience between people with textured hair and those with naturally straight hair. We want to ensure that licensed cosmetologists in Louisiana are able to do all types of hair.”

Black hairstylists like Jasmine Haynes and Troyann Freeman applaud the board for taking a major step toward being inclusive. They recall working hard to get their license and not being taught how to do their own hair.

“I only learned a little bit of the side that had to do with the type of hair that I actually had so I left having to get continuing education because I didn’t feel like I was prepared,” Haynes said.

The new rule goes into effect in June 2022. Haynes and Freeman say it’s a long time coming and something they hope rubs off in other states.

“Being a hairstylist you need to know how to work with all different curl patterns,” Freeman said.

“It’s time for people to start accepting us for who we are that the things that we do that are different or eccentric… it’s not ghetto. It’s our culture,” said Haynes.


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