Wendy Williams to Receive a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame - Black Enterprise
Black Enterprise magazine Fall 2019 issue

Talk show host Wendy Williams is indeed a star and now she is getting one!

The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce announced that the former radio host will be receiving the 2,677th star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for her work in television. The ceremony is scheduled for Oct. 17, according to The New York Daily News.

Along with Williams, here’s the full list of this year’s Hollywood Walk of Fame 2020 class, as per The Hollywood Walk of Fame website:

In the category of MOTION PICTURES: Mahershala Ali, Batman, Ruth E. Carter, Laurence Fishburne, Chris Hemsworth, Spike Lee, Julia Roberts, Octavia Spencer, and Lina Wertmüller

 

In the category of TELEVISION: Christina Applegate, Andy Cohen, Cindy Crawford, Terry Crews, Harry Friedman, Kathie Lee Gifford, Nigel Lythgoe, Milo Ventimiglia, Burt Ward, Wendy Williams, Dr. Phil McGraw, and Andy Kaufman (Posthumous)

 

In the category of RECORDING: Elvis Costello, Sir Lucian Grainge, Billy Idol, Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson, Alicia Keys, Andy Madadian, Mo Ostin, Bobby Rydell, Alejandro Sanz, Tanya Tucker, and Muddy Waters (Posthumous)

 

In the category of LIVE THEATRE/LIVE PERFORMANCE: Dave Chappelle and Billy Porter

 

In the category of RADIO: Susan Stamberg

During Williams’ 20 year stint in radio, she worked at Kiss FM (98.7), Hot 97 (97.1), and WBLS (107.5) in New York as well as Philadelphia’s Power 99 (99.1). Then, in 2009, she left radio to host her own television talk show, The Wendy Williams Show. That year she was also inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame. In 2004, she became a New York Times bestselling author with her book, Wendy’s Got The Heat, with Karen Hunter.

The Wendy Williams Show was recently renewed through the 2021-22 season. Over the summer, Williams opened up at Black Enterprise’s FWD conference about her estranged husband and former business partner, telling the live audience not to do business with a romantic partner. “Don’t do it,” she said. “Marry a cardiologist and you go on to be an engineer—make sure people support you but have your separate lives. When you come home you have more to talk about than business. Keep it separate.”