Psychologist Dr. Samantha on Overcoming Our ‘Internal Self-Image Problems’

Pay closer attention to your thoughts and beliefs, she says

Psychologist Dr. Samantha Madhosingh is the founder and CEO of ElevateHER, an organization serving women leaders by providing key strategies to rewire their brains, achieve mindset mastery, maximize communication and relationships, and ultimately create a legacy of lasting wealth.

Her cutting-edge, proprietary system is built on principles of neuroscience, human potential, positive psychology, cognitive therapy, leadership, and coaching to deliver fast, life-changing results.

 

(Dr. Samantha Madhosingh. Image: Jin Kim, Jin Kim Studio, Dallas)

 

A frequent media contributor and sought-after expert for both local and national media, “Dr. Samantha” as she is known, has appeared on broadcast TV and is the author of the books Strike it Happy! 101 Reflections to Revolutionize Your Life; the Strike it Happy! journal; and Magnify Your Brilliance: 5 Keys to a Powerful Life.

Black Enterprise caught up with Dr. Samantha to discuss neuroscience and human potential.

 

You’re a brain expert. Explain.

I’ve studied—quite extensively—about how the brain and mind work, as well as how each impact and influence behavior. I am also keenly interested in the mechanisms and processes of the brain that explain how and why people think and behave the way they do.

When you truly understand that the brain’s purpose, from both an evolutionary and biological perspective, is to keep you alive and safe, understanding why people behave the way they do is much easier. Our brain is conditioned by our interactions with everything and everyone in our environment. About 90% of our brain’s processing is unconscious and is influencing our actions without us even thinking about it. We develop biases and preferences because of who and what the brain thinks is safe. I teach my clients how their brain’s conditioning has led to their current biases, beliefs, and behavior patterns; how to unlearn the old conditioning; and how to prime their brain intentionally for what they want to achieve, how they want to be, and act.

 

What’s the connection between the brain and the study of metaphysics?

We create our reality by the meaning our brain forms from our experiences and the words we attach to them. It is from this narrative that our individual “stories” are created, and that we exist in life. Reality, then, is our brain’s interpretation of our physical experience. The very nature of our being is deeply spiritual and energetic, and yet even this is processed by our brain.

 

What critical factors do you think keep most people from reaching their true potential?

Most people have an internal self-image problem: Their deeply held beliefs about who they are and what they are capable of get in the way. This is the result of all the conditioning (and we all have been conditioned) they have received over the years. These internal limits, the point where their brain says, “This is what you deserve,” or “This is all you are capable of” function as sabotage, and in some way help them to “restore” balance. In other words, it helps them to maintain the status quo and allows the brain to rationalize that it is safe.

 

Share a challenge that you were able to overcome with your own brain—and an opportunity that you were able to harness by leveraging its power.

The biggest challenge I have had, and continue to have, is a depressed brain. At various periods in my life, I have succumbed to the damaging wiring and “lies” that my brain and mind have offered. Nevertheless, I have also learned how to create new neuropathways.  With lots of daily practice, I am able to prevent my brain from sliding me into deep darkness. If I listened to my depressed brain, I would not be a speaker, psychologist, writer, or mentor; because I would believe that I have nothing to offer. My own personal growth work is ongoing because our brains are like radars and are always seeking validating evidence for confirmation. The work I do both with my clients and personally continues to strengthen this muscle.

 

What’s your best advice to someone struggling with becoming their best self?

Get curious about your brain’s conditioning and pay closer attention to your thoughts and beliefs. If the language you are constantly using to describe yourself, your life, your work, your impact, your career is negative—then you will keep struggling. Reframe it. Focus on falling in love with and accepting who you are right now, even as you grow and evolve. You are beautifully perfect in all your imperfections. Stop focusing on what you perceive as “wrong” and start using all your gifts and strengths to your advantage.