50 of the Nation's Top Black Women Business Owners Join Forces
Entrepreneurship Women

50 of the Nation’s Top Black Women Business Owners Join Forces

(Image: iStock/Tassii)

Nicole Cober, Esq., Principal Managing Partner of The CJR Group, brings together 50 Black-female-owned businesses representing $200M in revenue to form The BOW Collective™, a groundbreaking organization of Black women business owners who partner together and compete for large-scale contracts in both the public and private sectors.

For years, Black women have not enjoyed equity in entrepreneurship. They have been turned down all too often seeking capital, connections, and contract opportunities to grow our businesses. Black women entrepreneurs have received only 0.3% in investment capital. As a result, just 1% of Black women businesses generate more than $250K in revenue.

“To change this disturbing reality, we formed BOW to collaborate and negotiate as a collective to support and scale Black women businesses. We have felt underserved by other organizations focused on supporting women in business. This organization is a measure to close the racial wealth gap in America and create generational wealth for our members and the Black community at large,” Cober says.

Business philanthropist Cober believes that by working together to get financial resources and contracts to these Black women enterprises, it will have a seismic economic impact on the Black community.

Notably, The BOW Collective™ requires that each of its businesses exceed gross annual revenues of $1 million. Considering that only 4.2% of all women-owned firms have revenues of $1 million or more, these Black women are business leaders within the small business community.

The BOW Collective™ members average 15 years in business, have more than 1,050 employees, and collectively have more than $200 million in gross annual sales.

A primary strategy of the Collective is to leverage their relationships with Fortune 500 companies and government agencies to broker multi-year contracts. Additionally, The BOW Collective™ wants stronger banking relationships and investment opportunities for their businesses.

“If you are looking to do business with or invest in Black women businesses, The BOW Collective members are here,” Cober says.

“If you are not doing business with Black women, your company is not optimizing your results. Our members stand ready to do business.”

In fact, the members’ existing clients include but are not limited to Amazon, GSA, the Department of Defense, Toyota, and Skanska.

The BOW Collective™ has the experience and capacity to work with powerhouses like Microsoft, HPE, and Verizon and are lining up meetings with supplier diversity teams to cut through red tape.

“We want to be the business development committee and help corporations find small businesses with capacity who can help these companies make their diversity goals. Conventional wisdom states that Black-owned businesses do not have the bandwidth to do business with large companies. The BOW Collective™ endeavors to change that perception with data and superior performance,” says Fatimah Moody, partner of LinkVisum Consulting Group, Inc., and a BOW Collective™ member.

“We want to leverage and improve those relationships and even encourage banks to compete for our collective business needs,” says Michelle Taylor, President and CEO of BETAH Associates, and a BOW Collective™ member.

Edie Fraser, CEO of the Women’s Business Collaborative, who serves on the Advocacy Board for the Collective, enthusiastically supports the organization: “It is a joy to congratulate Nicole Cober for establishing The Bow Collective, supporting more business for more women. It takes the village of mutual support and all who can provide capital and contracts to great women-owned businesses. It takes collaboration and sharing the rich resources and capabilities of these businesses and their leaders.”


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