Audra Lowe Transitions From News Reporter to Lifestyle Talk Show Host
Career Magazine

More Than Talk

Not all glamorous:
Lowe continued working in a variety of areas even after having been on-air. Her most frustrating gig was as a news associate at a CBS station in LA erasing tapes. “I had already been on the air at the smaller station and you have to be humble because it’s tough to go back in the other direction. And so here I am. There was a conveyer belt and when all the reporters finished filing their stories, their tapes would come down the belt and I would have to demagnetize them all. I did that for hours and hours overnight. The CBS TV newsroom was upstairs and I thought that if I crossed paths with the news directors, I might get an interview. Looking back, I realized I wasn’t ready for such a big step, but the ambition didn’t hurt! That may have been a test to see how bad I wanted to stay in a business that’s full of ups and downs. You get experience in all different areas of TV. It doesn’t happen overnight where you pop up on the air. You may end up doing a lot of work for free just to get the experience.”

Inspiration:
“I struggled for a long time to determine what my purpose would be and what my career would be. All I knew when I was growing up was that I was probably the skinniest, least aggressive, and most naïve kid in our family. My grandmother (aka “Granny,” a tough cookie herself) pulled me to the side one day and said, ‘Baby, if you ever want to be heard, you have to speak up. You have to learn how to use your voice.’ I was about 8 or 9, but she kept telling me over time. Now that I look back on what she said, she too probably helped me get to where I am today with her tough love and encouragement. Those same life lessons ended up being the foundation for what I get to do every day.” By the time Lowe arrived at high school, she had found her voice, but she was still unsure about what she wanted to do. Her mother suggested that she become a newscaster because she loved to talk. She ended up watching the news that day for almost 24 hours, fascinated with a career she had never thought of. “At that time, watching the news, I only saw one woman on the air who looked like me. My mother said, ‘you can do that if you want to,’ and I never looked back.”


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