How Silence is Your Best Ally in the Office
Black Enterprise Magazine September/October 2018 Issue

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They often say closed mouths don’t get fed, but sometimes those that are open a little too wide get led to the door. When it comes to networking and interacting with peers, a little too much chatter can put a major pause on engagement, productivity and progress. Effective listening has always been an asset for leaders, especially when it comes to making major boss moves.

Brazen Careerist writer Tim Murphy agrees, and offers key reasons why being more of a listener can be a major power play in business:

Why quiet is better: Taking a more measured approach and letting people indulge the desire to hear themselves speak can pay off in two ways. First, it lets the person do what they want, which is steer the conversation toward something they know well and like.

If you get a new contact or interviewer going on how great or exclusive or prestigious their company is, it makes them feel good because it’s (indirectly) about them. Now you’ve set the stage for them to form a favorable impression of you. It’s the same reason judges are more lenient after lunch — if their mood is elevated, your chances are way better.

Read more at Brazen Careerist …

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Janell Hazelwood

Janell Hazelwood is associate managing editor at Black Enterprise, managing content across core areas of Money, Career, Small Business and Technology. She is also a featured blogger with My Two Cents, providing insights on branding, millennial career development, employment trends and leadership. She was previously a content producer and copy editor for Black Enterprise magazine, working across several editorial sections. The Hampton University graduate got her start in the newspaper industry, having worked for companies including The New York Times and Scripps Howard News Service. Her works and insights have appeared on The Huffington Post, MadameNoire, E!Online, Brazen Careerist, CBS News, and Arise TV.


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