BlumBros Gets Ownership Rights to Their Music Through Human-Re-Sources - Black Enterprise
Black Enterprise Magazine September/October 2018 Issue

Recently, we talked about a new platform called, Human-Re-Sources developed by longtime music executive J. Erving. The platform gives artists more control over the ownership of their music, which is something they have been fighting for, for several years. Well, we now have another concrete use case. Meet the duo, BlumBros. They are two brothers from the Blumberg Projects in Philadelphia.

(Image: BlumBros)

(Image: BlumBros)

 

What was your original journey like in the industry trying to secure a record deal before finding out about Human-Re-Sources?

We started off performing and putting out music for our friends in our hood (Blumberg Projects). People started to notice us and the music started to spread around the city and we started performing shows everywhere. We got the attention of Todd Perry (our manager) and then we started coming back and forth to LA to really build our team.

How did you come across Human-Re-Sources?

Our first trip to LA, we met J. Erving and performed for him at his office and told him our story. He was telling us his plan for his company and we liked it but still weren’t ready to fully commit. He told us they were doing very fair deals and that we would be able to own our rights. We ended up coming back to LA to do some more meetings and we finally did the deal with him and released our first song called “Dope”.

What does the structure of your deal currently look like?

We are currently in a distribution deal. Human-Re-Sources takes 20% for distribution. They are also helping us with marketing and PR for each song that we release with them. We own all of our publishing and rights to our music. They give very fair deals and help artists continue to own their music.

What path would you recommend to new artists trying to enter the industry at this point and time?

We would say it starts with making good music and connecting with fans every day. You should also know what your brand is. We represent the kids from the projects who normally have a low chance at making it in life. People love our music and our fans can relate to our story. Also, we would say build a team around you that can help you spread your music. We know our value and we’re starting to understand the business and how to be entrepreneurs and artists.

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Sequoia Blodgett

Sequoia Blodgett is a Reporter for Black Enterprise. She is also the founder of Commas, a virtual entrepreneurship resource center with that provides everything you need to know about product, marketing, publicity, and fundraising, to make your entrepreneurial journey a lot less stressful.


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