Fully Vaccinated People Need Not Worry Too Much About People With COVID-19, CDC Says
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Fully Vaccinated People Need Not Worry Too Much About People With COVID-19, CDC Says

Biden
U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris waves as she arrives prior to departing Washington on travel to Atlanta, Georgia to promote the $1.9 trillion coronavirus disease (COVID-19) aid package known as the American Rescue Plan, at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, U.S., March 19, 2021. REUTERS/Leah Millis

A vaccinated person who is exposed to someone with COVID-19 does not need to be screened.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has new guidances that will relieve some people. Those who have their full vaccinations, do not have to be too cautious around those who become sick by the novel disease, the New York Daily News reported.

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Experts say that the rules are reflective of the studies that state nearly half of Americans have received their shots once and nearly 40% are completed vaccinated.

“At this point we really should be asking ourselves whether the benefits of testing outweigh the costs — which are lots of disruptions, lots of confusion and very little clinical or public health benefit,”  professor Dr. A. David Paltiel of Yale’s School of Public Health said.

It is possible for a vaccinated person to get COVID-19. However, it would not be as severe as one who did not get vaccinated, which means that there is no need to be concerned about complications or major interruptions in the workplace, home, or school.

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If even a vaccinated person were to get the coronavirus, it is shorter, less painful, and does not spread too far, which means there are no worries about quarantining and shutting down establishments, according to studies backed by CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky.

However, some people in the healthcare field are worried about signaling the wrong message, as more than 30,000 still get infected with the deathly disease on a daily basis.

“The average Joe Public is interpreting what the CDC is saying as ‘This is done. It’s over,’” said Dr. Michael Mina of Harvard University, a leading advocate of widespread, rapid testing.


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