272 NYPD Police Officers Filed for Retirement Since the Police Killing of George Floyd
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272 NYPD Police Officers Filed for Retirement Since the Police Killing of George Floyd

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(iStock/JANIFEST)

Ever since the protests that transpired as the result of George Floyd being killed by a Minneapolis police officer and it being recorded on a mobile phone, police officers within the New York Police Department have been filing for retirement, according to The New York Post.

After Floyd was killed on May 25th of this year, and protesters started clamoring for justice for him and many other Blacks who have died at the hands of police officers with barely any lasting consequences for the officers, cops have reportedly been demoralized because of the public outrage.

According to Fox News, the NYPD has stated that 272 officers have filed for retirement between Floyd’s death and June 23rd. That number represents a 49% increase over the same period from last year.

Patrick Lynch, president of the Police Benevolent Association said that police officers are “at their breaking point, whether they have 20 years on the job or only two. We are all asking the same question: ‘How can we keep doing our job in this environment?’ And that is exactly what the anti-cop crowd wants. If we have no cops because no one wants to be a cop, they will have achieved their ultimate goal.”

Ed Mullins, who has the role of president of the Sergeants Benevolent Association, said an “exodus” from the police department has started. According to Mullins, nearly 80 of his members have recently filed their retirement papers and that morale is “at the lowest levels I’ve seen in 38 years.”

“People have had enough and no longer feel it’s worth risking their personal well-being for a thankless position.”

“There is no leadership, no direction, no training for new policies,” he said. “Department brass is paralyzed (and) too afraid to uphold their sworn oath in fear of losing their jobs. Sadly, the people of this city will soon experience what New York City was like in the 1980s.”


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