Ludacris Is Inspiring New Generation of Young Girls With Netflix Series 'Karma's World'
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Ludacris Is Inspiring New Generation of Young Girls With Netflix Series ‘Karma’s World’

Ludacris and Daughter Karma (Instagram)

Ludacris prides himself on being a philanthropist and proud girl dad. Now, the rapper/actor has found a way to incorporate his passion for fatherhood and giving back through his new Netflix series named after his eldest daughter.

The Grammy Award-winning emcee is gearing up to entertain the youth through his new animated Netflix series Karma’s World. The kid’s show follows the life of middle-schooler Karma Grant, who has big dreams of making it into the music industry.

“My daughter was 6. She’s now 20 years old, and she used to come into my studio and interrupt me and say, Daddy, I want to rap too, and I would always kick her out,” Ludacris told WSVN.

His daughter continued her persistence to break into the music business, and a conversation Karma had with her famous dad helped spark the inspiration for his new show.

“She was so consistent that one day I had to sit her down and say, ‘if you want to do music, you have to talk about what goes on in your life because that’s what daddy does,’” he recalled.

Metro reports that the episodes center around Karma and how she stays true to herself through her music while dealing with new challenges in life and school.

The show, already streaming on Netflix, highlights different encounters his eldest daughter experienced at school.

“We started thinking about the stuff that goes on in her life, education, morals, fun, and it just birthed this whole idea,” Ludacris said.

“Body shaming, you know, talking about textures of hair and how to deal with other people who don’t realize or understand your texture of hair, family, friendships, you name it. We have so many great storylines.”

Ludacris is excited about the life jewels Karma’s World will teach the youth and leaders of tomorrow.

“What it’s going to do is … help them with their self-confidence and self-empowerment,” he said. “It creates dialogue even afterwards, and that’s the type of dialog we want to have with our kids because it helps them to open up a little bit and ask questions.”


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